Journal

Journal

Is Everything We Think We Know About School Shootings Wrong? (Part 2)

In Part I, we discussed how the “intuitive” measures to address potential school shootings – more security, more armed personnel, more expulsions, more mental health resources – actually aren’t effective at preventing shootings.  Instead, they mostly focus on dealing with shooters when they’ve already shown up with a gun. At that point, the risk of […]

Is Everything We Think We Know About School Shootings Wrong? (Part 1)

School shootings are terrifying, both in their suddenness and their level of violence. The age of the victims makes them tragedies that are hard to forget. The worst ones in recent years – Uvalde, Sandy Hook, Parkland – have inspired a host of strategies meant to stop future shooters.  This impulse makes a lot of […]

Can We ‘Moneyball’ Education? — Part 2

In Part 1, we explored how we might ‘moneyball’ education — apply some of the systemic principals pioneered by the Oakland A’s baseball team to maximize their ability to win in the face of budget constraints.  The system required using objective means rather than human perception and tradition to make decisions that improved the team’s […]

Can We ‘Moneyball’ Education? — Part 1

The 2003 book Moneyball, by Michael Lewis, was a deep dive into the system the Oakland A’s developed to select the best baseball players they could with their limited budget. It was a system that got a lot of pushback initially because it seemed to violate all the canons of player selection favored by scouts.  […]

Covid and Learning Loss

It’s taken a while, but data crunchers are finally quantifying how the Covid-19 pandemic affected student learning.  The results are detailed in a recent article from NPR ,  which offers 6 takeaways about pandemic learning loss. Debating Terms One of the points made by the article is that what students experienced as a result of […]

School Choice: Opportunity Hoarding (Part 6 of 6)

“We’ve tried: standardized tests, charter schools, smaller classes, longer school days, stricter discipline, looser discipline, tracking, differentiation. We’ve decided the problem is teachers. The problem is parents. What is true about almost all these reforms is that when we look for what’s broken we look at who they’re failing: poor kids, black kids, brown kids. […]

School Choice: How Choice Drives Segregation (Part 5 of 6)

In Part 1, we talked about the impact SCOTUS is having on education; in Part 2, we saw how the private school setting didn’t produce higher achievement for students. In Part 3, we looked at how the effects of School Choice compounded with each other to produce schools segregated by race, income, and social status. […]

School Choice: The Rest of the Slippery Slope (Part 4 of 6)

In Part 1, we talked about the impact SCOTUS is having on education; in Part 2, we saw how the private school setting didn’t produce higher achievement for students. In Part 3, we looked at how the effects of School Choice compounded with each other to produce schools segregated by race, income, and social status.  […]

School Choice: The Darkest Timeline (Part 3 of 6)

In Part 1, we discussed the recent SCOTUS decision in Maine. In Part 2, we looked at school choice’s inability to deliver on its most vaunted promise: higher achievement for students.  Because the private school setting doesn’t confer higher achievement (that comes from parental income level and educational attainment), it begs the question of what […]

School Choice: It Doesn’t Do What You Think it Does (Part 2 of 6)

School choice is a term that’s been applied to a variety of programs in education. In one very large district in North Carolina, school choice allowed parents to tell the district which elementary, middle, or high school they wanted their children to attend among all the public school options in the district.  In public school […]